Negative Effects Of The 1900 Buganda Agreement

In 1935, Sir Philip Mitchell arrived in Uganda as governor after serving in Tanganjika for the past sixteen years. He was convinced that the relationship between Uganda and the protective power should have a different character than that of the local authorities and the Tanganjika government. [9] Recognizing that the early protectorate had produced a pattern of growing distrust and clandestine change, Mitchell devised a plan to reform and restructure the system between the protectorate government and the Buganda government. [10] In asserting that the relationship between the protectorate government and the government of Buganda`s mother was that of protected and non-indirect domination, he planned to replace the post of provincial commissioner of Buganda with a resident and to remove district officials from the centre, provided that Kabaka was required to follow the advice of the resident and his collaborators. [9] However, under the Ugandan Convention of 1900, Kabaka was only required to respond to such advice in the case of the implementation of the Lukiiko resolutions. Relations between Kabaka, the protectorate government and its ministers deteriorated and, due to the limited power of the governor under the 1900 agreement to impose its council on Kabaka, the reorganization led to a steady decline in the influence that the protectorate government could exert in Buganda. [9] However, with the signing of the 1900 Agreement, kabakas, family members and leaders were assigned as civil servants and also as individuals. The land issue was addressed in Article 15, which estimated the total area of land in Buganda at 19,600 square miles. But the agreement also stipulated that if a survey were to be conducted, and it was found that Buganda had less than 19,600 square miles, „then the part of the country that must be entrusted to Her Majesty`s Government will be reduced to the extent by the lack found in the estimated area.“ After the agreement came into force, the country was divided in Buganda to Mailo and Kronland. Mailo Land belonged to the von Buganda government and its officials, while the Crown belonged to the protectorate government.

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